ON YOUR WEDDING DAY (2018) – people need people

There’s an old song called “People” sung by Barbra Streisand. It goes something like this…

People,
People who need people,
Are the luckiest people in the world

It’s a simple song with a simple premise – but boy does it deliver its message.

On Your Wedding Day is like that song. It’s a story about two people who come together, at different points in time and under different circumstances, and how their interactions change each others lives. It illustrates how they would not be the people they are if it weren’t for the other person. Whether good or bad or somewhere inbetween, their influence over each other’s lives can not be dismissed.

And that’s what this bittersweet romantic drama is about. The people you have united with, who you have loved, and how that changes who you are.

Park Bo-Young is adorable, as always. She’s probably the cutest actress in the country, with an almost other-wordly quality that reminds me more of an anime character than a human. And Kim Young-Kwang is a big, gangly guy with a genuine charisma that feels very familiar and relatable. He was perfect casting as the struggling dude who doesn’t seem particularly good at navigating his own life – but with the proper motivation can defy all odds and move mountains. The two had great chemistry together. Kim Young-Kwang, in particular, sold me on his boyish obsession with a pretty girl that carried over into manhood.

Life is a struggle. It’s easy to get sidetracked or waylaid. You are conditioned, by society and circumstances, to settle. To choose the path of least resistance. When you’re little, you believe you can do anything. And then life comes with a hatchet and carves away at your confidence and you start to wonder if maybe this is enough… or this? And the next thing you know, years have passed. Sometimes we need other people to remind of us the things we’ve set aside, to remind us of our past, of who we were and what we wanted before. Sometimes we need other people to ground us when we start living too much in our heads. Sometimes we just need another person to see us so that we can see ourselves through their eyes.

Relationships are a fundamental part of the human experience. People will come and go in your life, and it’s nearly impossible to know how long you will ever have with any one person.

This movie is a celebration of life. Of perspective. Of the understanding you gain from time.

You’ll fall in love, you’ll be curious, your heart might break a time or two. But you carry on.

If you’re in the mood for a very beautifully filmed movie about two very attractive people falling in love and growing up, then this film is for you.

RATING – 4/5 STARS.

Oh, and here’s Barbra.

Movie Review – Vanishing Time: A Boy Who Returned

Vanishing Time: A Boy Who Returned is a slow paced, achingly beautiful movie about isolation and friendship. The cinematography alone would be enough to warrant a recommendation – but the plot, the acting, and the direction are equally exceptional.

There are images and sequences in this film that will stick in my brain for the rest of my life. Ideas that will continue to pick at me. Moments that will continually unravel.

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BURNING (2018) – a meditation in isolation

Burning, a Korean film starring Yoo Ah-In, Jeon Jong-Seo, and Steven Yeun, is a bleak, atmospheric examination of the modern man. And by man I mean mankind, both men and women. It’s based on the short story Barn BurningĀ from The Elephant Vanishes by author Haruki Murakami.

Yoo Ah-In, one of my all time favorite Korean actors, plays a young man who is struggling. In every way imaginable. He struggles to find work. He struggles to come to terms with his upbringing. He struggles to relate to people. He struggles to piece together sentences. You can almost hear the wheels creaking as he struggles to form his own thoughts. It’s ironic that he considers himself a writer, even though there is little evidence of this aspiration around him. Yet perhaps it is most telling that he yearns to find a way to express himself, as this seems to be the insurmountable task of life.

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