OUTLIERS by Malcolm Gladwell

Every once in a while you read a book that not only changes how you view the world – but has the potential to change the world. Outliers is one of those books. It digs into our misconceptions about achievement, talent, economics, culture and luck. This book examines how your generation, your date of birth, your upbringing (and so much more) can significantly affect whether or not you achieve in this world.

Malcolm Gladwell is good at getting conversations started. He runs through a room full of huge subjects, lifting back curtains to give us glimpses into his hypothesis. You can learn a great deal from this book, but most importantly it asks you to do more work on your own. The conversation started here is important – and forces you to reflect upon your own circumstances in relation to where you currently are in the world. You’ll probably want to thank you parents or, if not, maybe change your own parenting. You may have heard of a few of these theories before – but I was honestly surprised by quite a few revelations in this book, leading me to “Ah Ha!” moments of my own while reading.

This book should be required reading… for all humans.

RATING: FIVE STARS

Title: Outliers
Author: Malcolm Gladwell
Originally published: November 18, 2008
Genre: Self-help book

 

WHEN WOMEN WERE BIRDS by Terry Tempest Williams

here on earth: when women were birds

Here on Earth: When Women Were Birds by Beth Conklin

I recently read “When Women Were Birds” and it’s superb. The book starts out with the death of her mother – who bequeaths her collected journals – only the daughter finds the journals are all blank. Every page, shockingly empty. From there she contemplates her mother’s life – her words, spoken and unspoken. It’s not a connected story, but small gathered thoughts and memories and personal reflections on the women in her life – her mother, her grandmother, teachers, women in the church – and also on women in general – the voice of women. It’s very powerful and thought provoking and hauntingly moving… apt for Mother’s Day. It has an intimacy in its honest portrayal of women, their secret lives, their silences, their many voices.  Like a cacophony of birds, it’s unified in that it’s loud and a thousand cries into the sky but not necessarily melodious. Don’t go into this book expecting a unified plotline, it’s more of a unified theme.

Tempest was raised Mormon in Utah – her mother and grandmother both lost to cancer caused by the nuclear testing in the 50’s – something the government didn’t own up to until the 80’s. It’s a unique book in which you can tell the author took pains to express some of the most difficult emotions. I admire anyone willing to dig so deep. 

Anyways, I loved it. But like bird song, I don’t treasure it. It felt universally beautiful but did not connect with me personally. 

When Women Were Birds : NPR

RATING: FOUR STARS

Title: When Women Were Birds
Author: Terry Tempest Williams
Originally published: April 10, 2012
Genres: Biography, Autobiography